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Continuous Insurance Enforcement Is Now New Car Insurance Law!

UK Car Insurance

The Department for Transport brings into force today the measures outlined as the Continuous Insurance Enforcement (CIE). The measures followed the recommendations of Professor David Greenaway’s review of motor insurance in the UK and are aimed at driving the estimated 1.5 million uninsured drivers off the roads of Britain.

The Enforcement

The Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005 allows the police to access the Motor Insurance Database simultaneously with Automatic Number Plate Reading equipment, which is connected directly to the DVLA and Police computers. This allows the Police to rapidly identify all cars that are being driven uninsured and they are currently seizing around 1,500 uninsured cars every week!

The penalty

The CIE scheme will provide a new fixed penalty of £10 for people who ignore an official reminder that their insurance has expired or is invalid. This will only apply to cars that are not declared as being off the road through SORN (Statutory Off Road Notification). It is still allowable to own an uninsured car for the purpose of off road driving.

Uninsured Drivers who are caught on the road risk a fine of £1000 minimum initially. This is to deter young drivers from using the court system as a ‘tax’ that is cheaper than purchasing car insurance cover.

Finally offenders will have their cars seized by the police and crushed and destroyed.

Car Insurance blog welcomes all moves to crackdown on all the risks posed by uninsured driving but is left wondering…

Are the Car Insurance Companies going to pass on the savings that they make through having to pay less into the uninsured driving pool to the customer in the form of cheaper car insurance? I doubt it!

And secondly if there are 1.5 million illegal road users in the UK and the police  are only catching 1500 per week…

Well you do the math!

Make / model schemes

Specialist schemes from